Katherine Brooks – Lost In Time

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By: Lisa Steinberg

 

Q) Tell us about premise for Lost In Time and how the concept came about?

 

A) I’ve always been very intrigued by the relationship, boundaries and dynamic that exist between a doctor (psychiatrist in this instance) and patient – every aspect of it. Why is it important a patient not know anything about a doctor? Not calling them by their first name. How a doctor isn’t supposed to accept gifts from a patient. All these rules. Rules in place for a reason. What is BEST for the patient. Trust me, I understand why this exists. I’m a professional patient in a way. The doctor is there to be transparent so that the patient can project all their stuff onto the doctor. But, what happens when a connection forms between doctor and patient? An undeniable connection. This is played beautifully by Jill Hennessy and Kate Gray. Then, of course, there’s the part of the story that brought the patient to the doctor, which was her being in Thailand in 2004 when the tsunami hit an island she was on.

 

Q) What are both the challenges and perks of doing this all independently?

 

A) You have the freedom to tell the truth and not compromise it by doing what a studio or investor wants. The challenge is always money.

 

Q) What do you hope viewers take away from watching the film?

 

A) HOPE.

 

Q) You talked a little bit about working on Lover In Lowlight as a possible film or something else collaborating with ChrmdPoet. What can you tell us about how you envision this and who you envision it with starring/casting?

 

A) ChrmdPoet and I are currently working on something right now which I will be able to talk about very soon – and I’m VERY excited!

 

Q) The LGBT fans deserve better campaign has been so incredibly beautiful, powerful, and strong. How do you think we can combat these continued tropes and traps that show runners seem to fall into?

 

A) Support LGBT filmmakers who care about fans more than ratings. Continue to take a stand like everyone is doing and getting their voices heard. I am SO PROUD to be a part of this. It has changed everything. I don’t think the people involved realize they are making history and are fucking amazing.

 

Q) You’ve been incredibly vocal about Lexa’s death on “The 100,” what has been your takeaway from this movement and what do you hope people learn from it?

 

A) I’ve learned that it’s important to think about your audience – to respect them. Honor them. Yes, characters are going to die, that is a part of life. But do it in a way that inspires hope. Death is not the end, just another beginning.

 

Q) Representation and quality representation are something films and TV shows need. How can filmmakers and TV writers integrate balance into their media?

 

A) By doing just that – being aware. LGBT is BIG news. They need to realize this and put our stories in there. And we NEED more LGBT behind the scenes! So, if you write and you are LGBT – then write. Whatever you do, it’s time to do it now. We need your voice.

 

Q) We fell in love with Loving Annabelle and you’ve continued to showcase such layered, beautiful characters. It’s a longtime LGBT fan favorite. What do you think it is about the film that continues to strike a chord with film watchers?

 

A) Annabelle is a strong lesbian who doesn’t give a fuck what other people think. We need characters like this. And I think her and Simone and great chemistry because it’s real. And people know truth when they see it on screen.

 

Q) What do you say to people who try to tell LGBT fans to move on?

 

A) I say this: “This character was very real for us and when you lose someone it takes time. Respect us.”

 

Q) What are some of the hardest obstacles for women in film and LGBT filmmakers?

 

A) Put yourself out there for the world to crucify. Thank God I have a community that is more of a family who protects me when I voice our stories to people who would like to shut me up.

 

Q) Is there anything else you would love fans to know about your work and why you are so passionate?

 

A) Everything I do now is for you. I can’t create without you.

 

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